Common Core Learning Standards

CCLS Category Sub-Category State Standard
2.MD.3 Measurement And Data Measure And Estimate Lengths In Standard Units. Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.
2.MD.4 Measurement And Data Measure And Estimate Lengths In Standard Units. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.
2.MD.5 Measurement And Data Relate Addition And Subtraction To Length. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
2.MD.6 Measurement And Data Relate Addition And Subtraction To Length. Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.
2.MD.7 Measurement And Data Work With Time And Money. Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.
2.MD.8 Measurement And Data Work With Time And Money. Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?
2.NBT.1 Number And Operations In Base Ten Understand Place Value. Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
2.NBT.1.a Number And Operations In Base Ten Understand Place Value. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a “hundred.”
2.NBT.1.b Number And Operations In Base Ten Understand Place Value. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
2.NBT.2 Number And Operations In Base Ten Understand Place Value. Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.

New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards

Students in classroom

New York State Standards Resources:

Common Core Learning Standards in New York State

The New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards (CCLS) are internationally-benchmarked and evidence-based standards. These standards serve as a consistent set of expectations for what students should learn and be able to do, so that we can ensure that every student across New YorkState is on track for college and career readiness. The New York State Education Department (NYSED) will continue to develop educator resources to support the successful implementation of the CCLS in classrooms across New York State over the next several years.

New York State Educator Expectations

In the 2012-13 school year, all teachers in grades Pre-K-8 are implementing CCLS-aligned instruction; all teachers in grades 9-12 should be in the process of implementing CCLS-aligned units and building content capacity.

Background and Context

  • When Were the CCLS Adopted?

    In January 2011, the NYS Board of Regents adopted the NYS P-12 CCLS, which include the Common Core State Standards and a small amount of additional standards uniquely added by New YorkState. The New York State P-12 CCLS were implemented in New York State schools at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year. In December 2016, new P-12 Science Learning Standards were adopted.

  • Common Core State Standards Background

    The Common Core State Standards were created through a collaborative effort on behalf of the National Governor’s Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. The standards were developed by key stakeholders in the field, including teachers, school administrators, and content experts. The final standards were released in June 2010. They have been adopted by forty-five states across the United States, and three territories.

  • Instructional Shifts Required by the Common Core

    In the summer of 2011, NYSED, in conjunction with Student Achievement Partners, developed 12 instructional shifts from the Common Core that educators should adhere to so that curriculum materials and classroom instruction are aligned with the CCLS. There are six shifts in English Language Arts/Literacy and six shifts in Mathematics, as follows:

Common Core Shifts in ELA/Literacy
Shift 1 Pre-K-5, Balancing Informational & Literary Texts
Shift 2 6-12, Knowledge in the Disciplines
Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity
Shift 4 Text-based Answers
Shift 5 Writing from Sources
Shift 6 Academic Vocabulary

 

Common Core Shifts in Mathematics
Shift 1 Focus
Shift 2 Coherence
Shift 3 Fluency
Shift 4 Deep Understanding
Shift 5 Application
Shift 6 Dual Intensity

Downloadable Resources

Resources may contain links to sites external to the EngageNY.org website. These sites may not be within the jurisdiction of NYSED and in such cases NYSED is not responsible for its content.